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LATEST NEWS

 
 
3/30/24
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
https://easyreadernews.com/bchd-campus-plan-at-risk-by-zoning-fracas/
 
3/29/24
UPDATE! Time to Comment Extended to APRIL 15
Comment on the Redondo Beach Draft General Plan by April 15
SUPPORT the proposed max. 0.75 FAR for public land that limits the size and density of development on public land and protects residents and open space.
  • Email PLANRedondo@redondo.org 

  • OR, add your comment to the plan here (see page 2-11 of plan on Land Use for Public Institutional (PI), with a max. FAR of 0.75 for non-city public land parcels.

 
3/19/24

  • PROTECT Public Land against high-density high-rises that damage our community.

  • SUPPORT the Redondo Beach Draft General Plan that limits density on public land.

 

The Redondo Beach Draft General Plan is in the public comment stage, and it proposes to limit the density and size of structures on public land.  But, BCHD wants to build a high-density high-rise RCFE that is 100%

privately owned on public land.

 

BCHD claims to be "singled out" by the draft General Plan, when actually all public lands in Redondo Beach are zoned for less density.  (The ONLY two exceptions are reasonable: Redondo Beach City Hall and Redondo Beach City Annex.  Both are owned by the city to benefit residents).

Yet, BCHD wants special treatment and they are working hard to get it.

 

Preventing overdevelopment is crucial, especially on public land where only private companies benefit.

 

If you want to prevent BCHD from avoiding fair and long-debated development rules that protect public land and residents, please consider the following:

 

  • Comment on the Draft General Plan.  

  • Mention that you are in support of the max 0.75 Floor Area Ratio ("FAR") limit for Public Institutional (PI) land as proposed in the draft General Plan.

To comment, Email PLANRedondo@redondo.org or add your comment to the plan here. Public comments are being accepted until APRIL 15.

 

You can also attend the City of Redondo Beach community meeting in person to review and comment on the plan. Or register for the Zoom meeting here:

 

General Plan Community Meeting

Wed., 3/20 from 6 to 8 p.m.

 

Redondo Beach Main Library

3/12/24

One week ago today an important election was held. With nearly all the votes counted, we are happy to confirm that Bridget Lewis was elected and will continue as our Torrance District 2 City Councilmember. As of today’s count, she has received 8% more votes and is 437 votes ahead of her opponent. The Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk will certify final election results on March 29, 2024.

We thank EVERYONE who got involved and took action, from volunteering, to getting the word out, to voting. 

Your vote did indeed make a difference.

 

While local elections don't always get a lot of attention, our City Council representative can profoundly impact our neighborhood, our District, and the future of the City of Torrance at large. With her proven resident- and safety-focused leadership, we know that Bridget will act on residents' behalf to protect our quality of life, and safeguard our community.

3/3/24

Time to VOTE!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Haven't voted yet?

 

Three ways to return your ballot:

Torrance Human Resources Dept.

3231 Torrance Blvd (near Katy Geissert Library)

 

Redondo Beach Main Library

303 N. Pacific Coast Highway

 

Dominguez Park (next to historic Morrell House)

200 Flagler Ln.

Elections can come down to a handful of votes. Make your vote count!

TRAO endorses Bridgett Lewis, our current District 2 City Councilmember - 

An experienced public safety professional, fierce advocate for our quality of life, and endorsed by Torrance Police Officers and Firefighters.

2/20/24

What a vote for Bridgett Lewis means for you

Bridgett Lewis is a fierce advocate of quality of life and a public safety professional. She is experienced and knowledgable about the challenges facing the City of Torrance and its residents.
  • Current Torrance Councilmember for District 2
  • Actively supported residents against BCHD overdevelopment 
  • Nearly 20 years in public safety and public service 
  • Current Manager of Homeland Security for the Port of Long Beach
  • Endorsed by Torrance Police Department and Firefighters
  • Endorsed by a host of current and past Torrance City Councilmembers, our State Assemblymember and Congressman
 
Learn more here: https://www.lewisfortorrance.com/
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2/11/24

Tribute to Mayor Bill Brand

Easy Reader - February 10, 2024
https://easyreadernews.com/redondo-beach-mayor-bill-brand-big-shoes-to-fill/
_____________________

Redondo Beach Mayor Bill Brand leaves big shoes to fill. And we must

 

by Bob Pinzler


It is ironic that Bill Brand, the Mayor of Redondo Beach who died over this last weekend, got his start fighting a project called “Heart of the City.” To many, he was exactly that heart, giving years of his life, including those when valiantly fighting the cancer that ultimately killed him, to the betterment of the quality of life of the people he represented.

During his 15 years serving first the people of District 2 as their Councilmember, and then the City as a whole as Mayor, Bill believed in preserving, in fact, reestablishing, the way of life we had all come to this beach community to relish.

His primary dream was restoring the land on which the AES power plant sits to its natural habitat. By doing so, the open space it would provide would benefit generations of the people of this area.

Another legacy Bill will leave behind is the lesson of perseverance. When first elected, he was a lone voice for the principles that were the basis of his election. Being the one on a four-to-one City Council is not fun. Nor does it provide many opportunities for hope.

Yet, Bill persevered. He built relationships with new Council members, and with the elected officials that have served us at the County, in Sacramento, and in Washington. He established and led a coalition that enabled the implementation of legislation at the Council level and by initiative. State funding was obtained for power plant site projects. In his final years, he saw the power plant finally shut down, opening opportunities for open space development.

The question often asked of public officials as they leave office is, “Has what you have done helped to make our lives better?”
Without question Bill Brand answered with a resounding “yes.”

It is now up to us to raise up that fallen flag and lead. Not only to complete what Bill began, but to expand upon it. Often people are said to be a “hard act to follow,” However, it is incumbent upon us to not let that keep us from working as hard as we did with him.

In fact, without Bill, we will just have to work that much harder.




Bob Pinzler served on the Redondo Beach City Council for two terms, from April 1993 to March 2001.

ER
 
2/10/24  The Passing of Redondo Beach Mayor Bill Brand 

Announced today, the tremendous loss of Bill Brand - passionate activist, environmentalist and public servant. 

 

Announcement Regarding the Passing of Mayor Bill Brand

 

"The family and members of the City Council of Redondo Beach announce with great sadness and heavy hearts, the death of Mayor Bill Brand.

Mayor Bill Brand, 65, passed away at home on the evening of Friday, February 9th, with his loving wife, family, and friends by his side. His family and friends surrounded him in the last few days during his sudden turn of health. He valiantly fought stage four lung cancer over the past four and a half years, as only he could. He survived his specific cancer longer than any other diagnosed in the United States. A testament to his will to live, his will to move forward, and his will to lead the community he loved so much.

Mayor Brand was born in Dallas, Texas, and moved to the South Bay in 1966. Finding the Seaside Lagoon, he thought that he had found heaven. His service to the community began in 2000. First, as a concerned resident, then as a champion for open space where he created a non-profit organization, the South Bay Parkland Conservancy, and finally as a member of local elected office. He co-authored a winning ballot measure in 2008 amending the City Charter and was a fierce advocate for many environmental and coastal priorities, including being the major driver in the final decision for the shutdown of the AES power plant. Being able to see that event through was an accomplishment of which he was extremely proud.

Mayor Brand was elected twice to the City Council of Redondo Beach, starting in 2009, and then twice to the office of Mayor. He continued to serve admirably and extensively while undergoing arduous treatments. His work as the Mayor of Redondo Beach, while hospitalized several times, and often in pain, continued. He remained dedicated to his vision of a waterfront park to the very end.

Service announcements for private and public ceremonies will be forthcoming. In lieu of flowers, his wife and family are asking that donations be sent to the non-profit he started, the South Bay Parkland Conservancy, or the Cancer Support Community South Bay, in Bill’s memory. Flags at City Hall will be flown at half-mast in honor of Bill’s passionate service to our community."

 
2/8/24 - Candidates Forum
Missed the Candidates Forums? Check out the videos below:

 

District 2 Candidates Bridgett Lewis and Andrew Lee

Feb. 7 2024

Hosted by West Torrance and Southwood Homeowners Association

See video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=65R42H6qRXQ

 

Districts 2,4, & 6 Candidates

Hosted by the League of Women Voters, 1/31/24 

See video here:
1/26/24 - Upcoming Torrance City Council Candidates Forums

Attend the Candidate Forums, ask questions, get informed.

 

District 2 City Councilmember Candidates

Bridgett Lewis and Andrew Lee

Bert Lynn Middle School cafeteria

5038 Halison St.

Wednesday, Feb. 7 at 7:00 p.m.

Sponsored by the Southwood HOA and West Torrance HOA. 

All City Council Candidates

Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce

3480 Torrance Blvd., Suite 305

Tuesday, Jan. 30. 8:30 a.m.

Sponsored by the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce. Reservations required. Go to www.TorranceChamber.com/event/candidatesforum2024/.

All City Council Candidates

Toyota Meeting Hall, 3330 Civic Center Dr.

Wednesday, Jan. 31. at 7 p.m.

Sponsored by the Torrance League of Women Voters. 

1/25/24 - Torrance Election Coming Soon - TRAO Endorses Bridgett Lewis

An important local election is coming soon. Our Torrance District 2 Councilmember will be elected on March 5, 2024. 

 

TRAO endorses Bridgett Lewis, our current District 2 City Councilmember for this important role. 

 

Here’s why we believe she is the best candidate to continue to protect our neighborhood and community.

 

Bridgett has:

 

  • Served our district since Sept. 2022.

  • A proven track record as a strong leader and fierce advocate for quality-of-life and safety issues facing Torrance residents.

  • Actively worked to protect our neighborhood and our children against BCHD and their overdevelopment plans.

  • Nearly 20 years of experience in public safety

  • Worked at the Torrance Police Department in communications and intelligence.

 

She is currently:

 

  • Manager of Homeland Security with the Port of Long Beach

  • An active member of our City Council and longtime resident who understands the challenges facing our city.


Mail-in ballots come out in early February.

If you are interested in learning more, check out lewis4torrance.com

 
1/24/24 BCHD Board Meeting

In Sept. 2022, the BCHD Board approved giving their CEO authority to finalize a 65-to 95-year ground lease contract with private developer PMB LLC. The skeleton-only contract was filled with “TBDs” on key terms. It also included a 120-day period to complete key “due diligence” items.

To date, 480 days later, after providing NO substantive updates publicly, BCHD has no agreement with PMB on key terms of the contract. At their Jan. 24 Board Meeting, they planned to:

  • Extend the “due diligence” period for another 6 months,

  • Remove allcove from the scope for the RCFE

  • Add an “out” clause for BCHD

At the beginning of the meeting however, they pulled the item from the Jan. agenda and plan to move it to the Feb. meeting.

 

BCHD is moving forward with the allcove youth mental health building on Flagler lot.

  • Originally presented as part of the RCFE structure, BCHD plans to build a standalone structure on the C2-zoned Flagler lot. 

  • Awarded Paul Murdoch an additional $149K to provide bridging docs and specs to a new design builder that will be sought. They plan to create and get out a request for proposal in Feb.

  • Note: BCHD received a grant for mental health services for youth from the  However the grant is to serve LA County Service Planning Area 8 (SPA 8): the communities of Athens, Avalon, Carson, Catalina Island, El Segundo, Gardena, Harbor City, Hawthorne, Inglewood, Lawndale, Lennox, Long Beach*, Hermosa Beach, Manhattan Beach, Palos Verdes Estates, Rancho Dominguez, Rancho Palos Verdes, Redondo Beach, Rolling Hills, Rolling Hills Estates, San Pedro, Torrance, Wilmington, and others. These areas are well beyond their taxpayer base of the three beach cities: Hermosa Beach, Manhattan Beach and Redondo Beach.  How will
12/14/23
Mismanagement and Missteps - BCHD opens bike path

BCHD quietly opened its bike path along Flagler Alley in the City of Redondo Beach with a small ribbon-cutting ceremony on Wed, Dec. 13. Expect some BCHD PR about the bike path. Remember: we do not have an issue with bike paths. However, BCHD’s management of this project has been plagued with missteps, miscommunication, misrepresentation, cost increases, and delays from the start.

 

Here are some facts:

 

  • BCHD never had the full approval of the City of Torrance to build the bike path, the majority of which was in Torrance. BCHD proceeded to spend the grant funds from Metro anyway.

  • Bike path project was marred by misinformation, cost increases, delays 

    • ~5 years between grant request and "completion"

    • 18 months of incomplete reporting to Metro

    • 95% of the $1.8M in taxpayer-funded grant money was spent on only 33% of the originally proposed project. 

    • The short Redondo Beach bike path costs more to build per foot than a freeway.

    • According to BCHD, cost increases were mostly due to “the addition of a retaining wall” to shore up the hillside. Was there an ulterior motive in BCHD’s use of taxpayer funds?

  • BCHD had no experience or expertise in this type of project

  • Poor planning by BCHD led to an unsafe and expensive project.

 

See link here for more details.

 

Bottom line: watch out for increased bike traffic - the resulting bike lane is dangerous to bike riders and public 

  • Exposes bike riders to oncoming traffic at the intersection at Towers St and Flagler Lane

  • With increased use and low visibility on a blind curve, there is a greater likelihood of accidents, (e.g., groups of students on e-bikes have been seen going straight into the traffic lane, forcing cars to stop suddenly.)


 

If BCHD can’t manage a little project, how can they manage a big one?

Read letters to the editor about BCHD's bike path here.

Tear down that wall

 

"Dear ER,

 

As a Redondo Beach resident, I would like to applaud the City Of Torrance for hearing its residents, and not approving the bike path located at the end of Diamond Street. Diamond Street is a quiet, dead end street with a minimum amount of traffic. The obvious result of this half completed Beach Cities Health District project is an increase in traffic. The project was started without the approval of the Diamond Street residents. The building of a six-foot high wall is not in the rendering. The bike path will change from a wider path to a narrow path, which may prove to be a hazard for the bike riders. Some of the questions on Redondo Beach residents’ minds include why a six foot high concrete wall was built on BCHD property if it is not a part of the bike lane, and why was the project funded before getting the approval of the City of Torrance?"

 

Sincerely,

 

Philip de Wolff


#bchd #bikepathtonowhere

________________
9/27/23
BCHD Board Meeting

Tonight - September Board Meeting

Agenda: here.

CEO Report: here.

Up for approval - Project management contract for construction of the allcove building on Flagler Lot - See allcove presentation here.

​8/20/23
BCHD Project

 

In Sept. 2022, the BCHD Board rushed through approval of up to a 95-year ground lease contract with private developer PMB LLC, giving BCHD’s CEO full authority to negotiate key elements of the contract, which were left blank. Terms included a 120-day period to complete the so-called “due diligence” items. 

 

According to their latest reports, BCHD is still “resolving” key terms of the contract, nearly one year later. Bakaly stated he plans to come back to the Board in September (or later). 

8/16/23
More Letters on the Bike Path to nowhere

Read more letters to the editor from Redondo Beach residents on BCHD's costly and self-serving bike path project.

7/17/23

Tuesday, July 18, at Henderson Library, 6:30 p.m.

 

Come out and meet Torrance District 2 Councilmember Bridgett Lewis and City Manager Aram Chaparyan for a District 2 Community Meeting on Tuesday, July 18 at 6:30 p.m. at Henderson Library. Hear what's happening in West Torrance and join the conversation.

 

7/13/23

 

BCHD has begun construction on their "Diamond Street" Bike Lane project. See the latest Letter to the Editor below and other letters and articles on this costly and mishandled project.

See link here.

Bike path dollars don’t go far

 

https://easyreadernews.com/letters-to-the-editor-7-13-23/

 

Dear ER:

 

BCHD received a $1.83 million grant from Metro for a quarter-mile long bike path between Redondo Beach and Torrance. On Jan. 13, 2019, the Beach Cities Health District Board passed a resolution stating the Class I bike path was an “integral component” of the proposed Healthy Living Campus. This bike path was not included in the DEIR of the Healthy Living Campus and subsequently not studied for its proposed impacts. This is synonymous with BCHD’s track record to skirt the public and surrounding neighboring community and move forward with their agenda of no accountability. BCHD’s initial grant “estimate” for the Measure M funds was excessive, at $1,500 per foot. However, BCHD’s current $3,500 per foot for $1.4 million for 400-feet is irresponsible use of our tax dollars. Given their egregious spending and lack of accountability, how can we trust them with the Health Living Camps project that is 253,700 sq.ft. The bike path lacked permission from the City of Torrance, so it abruptly stops at the Redondo Beach property line.

As Former Councilmember Bob Pinzler states in an Easy Reader article: “Why would BCHD be so insistent on building this dangerous, unneeded, and incomplete bike path when the city that controls two thirds of it has said no?”

 

 

Candace Nafissi

Redondo Beach

6/22/23

New to the project? Beach Cities Health District is working with a private developer, owner and operator PMB LLC to finalize their application for a Conditional Use Permit (CUP) and Design Review to the City of Redondo Beach. According to BCHD sources, it has again been pushed back, now perhaps in the 3rd or 4th quarter 2023. 

The controversial project then goes to a new decision maker: the Redondo Beach Planning Commission. For the first time in this multi-year process, the BCHD Board will not be approving the project.

Next steps: The Redondo Beach Planning Commission will schedule hearings to review the project and get public input. They will decide  whether the project complies with Redondo Beach municipal code and design guidelines that include compatibility with neighborhood character, mass and scale. The project cannot move forward, as proposed without approval.

 

Note: BCHD may also need permits from the City of Torrance for grading work on Torrance property that runs along the eastern border of the project.

A few things to know:

  • In the 65 to 95 year ground lease to PMB, PMB (or their LLC) would develop, own and operate the massive RCFE project. They would have 100% ownership – BCHD has 0% ownership. 

  • According to their BCHD would PAY MORE to "lease back" a small portion of the nearly 300,000 sq. ft. structure for their own admin offices and for a youth center (allcove - currently funded by a grant) than they would receive from the PMB for 3 acres of PUBLIC LAND

  • As currently planned, the city block-long RCFE structure would tower 100 ft. over surrounding homes in Torrance and Redondo Beach. It is currently proposed at 83 ft. high on the edge of the 30- ft. elevated site along Beryl and Flagler Lane.

  • Due to the height of the structure, construction noise would EXCEED federal thresholds, causing “Significant” impacts to surrounding residents (Ref: HLC EIR).

  • The massive structure and 24/7 operations on the elevated site would PERMANENTLY damage the quality of life of surrounding neighborhoods and open sky views in the South Bay.

 

6/9/23

Read the latest article on BCHD's bike path.

On Local Government:

PROPOSED BIKE PATH MISSED THE CUTOFF

SPECIAL CONTRIBUTOR | JUNE 8, 2023

by Bob Pinzler

Flagler Alley in Redondo Beach and Torrance has long been a source of controversy. It connects Diamond Street in Redondo to Towers Avenue in Torrance.

During the 1980s, consideration was given to connecting Diamond to Flagler Lane in Redondo to alleviate vehicle traffic clogging Aviation Boulevard leading to what was then TRW. Redondo even started to purchase lots along Flagler Lane to facilitate its widening.

When that failed, the alley went untended, but was used by bike riders looking for a shortcut from Redondo High to the northern part of the city. The problem was that at the northern end, the alley fed directly onto Flagler Lane, where it bends sharply into Towers Street, which then proceeds downhill to the east. This residential street is very active and overused, particularly during the school drop-off and pick-up hours. Many accidents occurred.

Part of the problem has been that those exiting Flagler Alley add to a mix of skateboarders, pedestrians, cars, and commercial traffic, which those streets were never meant to bear. E-bikes have been added to the mix, and the speeds at which those riders emerged onto Towers has exacerbated the safety issue. The danger finally forced Torrance to build a partial barricade at its end to force riders to dismount. It has been reasonably successful.

Many years ago, as part of the planning for its proposed expansion into residential care for the elderly, the Beach Cities Health District obtained a grant from LA County to build a high-end bike path. It would, they said, create a means by which riders could safely take advantage of that Flagler Alley shortcut.

The opposition from the Torrance residents at the bottom of the hill grew so loud that Torrance rejected BCHD’s program, and refused to allow their land to be used for the path. Torrance was emphatic that the altered traffic flow, including bikes and e-bikes that would inevitably use the “shortcut,” would create even more serious and frequent safety issues, especially for children.

The grant BCHD got was for $1.8 million dollars. They were to use that money not only for building the entire Flagler Alley path, but for sidewalks and other amenities. The proposed bike path is also abutted by a large, steep hill. Substantial work on that hill would have been needed, but Torrance has very strict hillside use ordinances, and said no to the hillside work.

Recently, BCHD did a complete switch. They claimed they would build about one third of the path in the Redondo portion of Flagler Alley only. Yet, BCHD also claimed now it would cost $1.5 million of the $1.8 million grant to accomplish that diminished distance. The bike path is now more expensive per mile than a mile of freeway.

The “shortcut” which BCHD now proposes would leave bike riders in the middle of an alley, careening head on into traffic — pedestrian and vehicle. This area is not engineered nor even dedicated for high-volume traffic.

Bicycle lanes are an important mobility element for any city. Making them safe must be the first priority. The Flagler Alley proposal does not meet that test. If BCHD insists on spending on the Redondo portion, it would be in the best interests of Torrance to completely shut off that access.

Closing the alley would be safer, and not inconvenient for bikers. Since the “shortcut” was envisioned more than a decade ago, bike lanes have been added to Beryl Street to facilitate safer traffic, thus making the more dangerous alleyway a moot point.

Why would BCHD be so insistent on building this dangerous, unneeded, and incomplete bike path when the city that controls two thirds of it has said no?

That $1.8 million could be better spent elsewhere. ER

https://easyreadernews.com/on-local-government-proposed-bike-path-missed-the-cut-off/

6/8/23

Recent letter to the editor about BCHD's bike path.

PATH TO NOWHERE

Dear ER

From even the most casual review, the Beach Cities Health District has spent around $500,000 in planning the bike path from Beryl and Flagler; along Flagler in Torrance; and then a 200-foot long strip in Redondo Beach. Based on the distance and work planned, well over half of the expenditure is for Torrance. BCHD announced it plans to spend $1.8 million to improve that 200-feet in Redondo Beach, from Diamond and Prospect to the Torrance city border at Flagler Alley. That is both an unreasonable, exorbitant expenditure and also a stranded segment because Torrance has rejected the work from the Torrance border to Beryl and Flagler.

BCHD should not be allowed to waste $2 million of scarce taxpayer resources on a 200-foot strip of stranded bike path. BCHD needs to stop playing real estate developer for a 100% privately owned building and get back to basics — providing benefits to the residents who reside in the District (Redondo Beach, Hermosa Beach, and Manhattan Beach).

Mark Nelson

Redondo Beach

 

_________________

 

Beach Cities Health District is working with a private developer, owner and operator PMB LLC to finalize their application for a Conditional Use Permit (CUP) and Design Review to the City of Redondo Beach. According to latest BCHD sources, they now plan to submit in the 2nd quarter 2023. 

The controversial project then goes to a new decision maker: the Redondo Beach Planning Commission. For the first time in this multi-year process, the BCHD Board will not be approving the project.

Next steps: The Redondo Beach Planning Commission will schedule hearings to review the project and get public input. They will decide  whether the project complies with Redondo Beach municipal code and design guidelines that include compatibility with neighborhood character, mass and scale. The project cannot move forward, as proposed without approval.

 

Note: BCHD may also need permits from the City of Torrance for grading work on Torrance property that runs along the eastern border of the project.

A few things to know:

  • In the 65 to 95 year ground lease to PMB, PMB (or their LLC) would develop, own and operate the massive RCFE project. They would have 100% ownership – BCHD has 0% ownership. 

  • BCHD would PAY MORE to "lease back" a small portion of the nearly 300,000 sq. ft. structure for their own admin offices and for a youth center (allcove - currently funded by a grant) than they would receive from the PMB for 3 acres of PUBLIC LAND

  • As currently planned, the city block-long RCFE structure would tower 100 ft. over surrounding homes in Torrance and Redondo Beach. It is currently proposed at 83 ft. high on the edge of the 30- ft. elevated site along Beryl and Flagler Lane.

  • Due to the height of the structure, construction noise would EXCEED federal thresholds, causing “Significant” impacts to surrounding residents (Ref: HLC EIR).

  • The massive structure and 24/7 operations on the elevated site would PERMANENTLY damage the quality of life.

NEWS ARCHIVE

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